This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2023 to April 2024.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2023-2024, please consult the class search website.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

Course search


14 Results

ANBI 110.3: Introductory Animal Bioscience

This class examines the domestication of agricultural and companion animals and their adaptation to human society. Comparative aspects of domestication, genetics, reproduction, neonatal development, endocrinology and environmental impacts will be reviewed.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours and 2 Practicum/Lab hours


ANBI 298.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


ANBI 320.3: Equine Science

This course presents the evolution of the horse's role in society, its current uses and the significance of the local and global equine industry. Management topics include nutrition, hoof care and first aid. Health care topics include infections and metabolic diseases and equine parasites. Reproduction and genetics lectures present reproductive endocrinology, the application of new technologies and basic equine genetics. Equine behaviour and learning is discussed in conjunction with the management, training and equine welfare.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours and 2 Practicum/Lab hours
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of BIOL or permission of the instructor.


ANBI 360.3: Canine and Feline Science

This course covers canine and feline evolution, history of domestication and breed development. Genetics, anatomy and reproduction will be discussed, as well as the use of dogs in therapy, herding, etc. will be discussed. Legislation and licensing pertaining to dogs and cats will be included. Feeding, care and management of cats and dogs will be covered.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of BIOL courses.


ANBI 375.3: Animals and the Environment

Discusses the important role that domestic animals play in an environmentally appropriate land use strategy, in both extensive and intensive systems. The major focus will be to examine animal agriculture's ecological footprint including impact on riparian areas, nutrient cycling, climate change, ecological diversity including wildlife and human health. Sustainable agricultural practices including mitigation strategies for reducing the effects of animal agriculture on the environment will be covered.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 60 credit units of university level courses or permission of the instructor.


ANBI 398.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


ANBI 411.3: Behaviour of Domestic Animals

Provides students with an understanding of the principles of animal behaviour, and how these relate to management of domestic species. Emphasizes the social behaviour of animals and introduces the relationship between animal behaviour and animal welfare.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): ANSC 212 and completion of 60 credit units.


ANBI 420.3: Comparative Animal Endocrinology

Examines the fundamentals of animal endocrine systems. Similarities and differences in endocrine function between different vertebrate groups will be discussed. Topics include anatomy and physiology of hormones and glands, mechanisms of hormone action, hormonal regulation of various physiological processes in animal systems, endocrine manipulation and monitoring, endocrine disruption and endocrine methodologies.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 224.3 and 60 credit units, or permission of the instructor.


ANBI 470.3: Applied Animal Biotechnology

This course examines the application of biological technologies to improve the health or productivity of food and companion animals. Topics include reproductive technologies; transgenic techniques; molecular genetics in animal selection; use of recombinant proteins for growth, lactation and reproduction; functional feeds including alternatives to antibiotics and a review of immune function including vaccine technologies. In addition, regulatory, ethical and safety aspects of technologies will be considered.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): ANSC 313 and one of VBMS 325 or BIOL 317.


ANBI 471.3: Animal Microbiomes and Health

This course will introduce students to the concepts around the microbiome of animals and its connection to health of the host animal. A specific focus will be the gut microbiome of animals. Emphasis will be on the experimental techniques currently used to study microbiomes, the metabolic pathways they mediate, and the connection the host animal. Lectures include topics on the role microbiomes play in host health, nutrition and behavior through the gut-brain axis.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 75 credit units, including FABS 212.3 or BMSC 210.3.


ANBI 475.3: Field Studies in Arctic Ecosystems and Indigenous Peoples

This field-based travel course will provide hands-on research experience in natural ecosystems in the sub-arctic of the Hudson Bay coast in northern Manitoba at the interface between animals, people, and the environment. This experiential course is an intensive introduction to and connection between the ecology and Indigenous cultures of the sub-arctic. There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.

Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 60 credit units of university level courses and permission of the instructor
Note: This field course takes place in mid-August and is based out of Churchill, Manitoba.


ANBI 492.3: Literature Thesis in Animal Bioscience

The student develops a question to be explored in depth in an area relevant to animal bioscience. Working with a faculty supervisor the student prepares a thesis on the topic. Most often the thesis relies on current scientific literature but occasionally additional new data are analyzed. Presentation of the thesis is required.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Restriction(s): Restricted to students enrolled in the Animal Bioscience degree program.
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 75 credit units.
Note: Students with credit for ANSC 492, ANSC 494, or ANBI 494 cannot receive credit for this course.


ANBI 494.6: Research Thesis in Animal Bioscience

Students considering graduate work are encouraged to enroll. Placements are limited. The student develops a question to be explored in depth in an area relevant to animal bioscience. Working with a faculty supervisor the student collects relevant data during a series of experiments over the summer months. Two additional advisors participate in the student's committee. Statistical analysis of data is conducted and the student prepares a thesis based on the results. Each student delivers a presentation in a conference setting.

Weekly hours: 2 Lecture hours
Restriction(s): Restricted to students with at least a 70% cumulative average as of January of their third year of the Animal Bioscience degree program. Restricted to students enrolled in the Animal Bioscience degree.
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of 75 credit units. Permission of the department required.
Note: Students with credit for ANSC 492, ANSC 494, or ANBI 492 cannot receive credit for this course.


ANBI 498.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.