This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2019 to April 2020.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2019-2020, please consult the class search website.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

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ASKI 101.3: Field Studies in the Environment

This course introduces students to environmental science with emphasis on sustainable development of land, water and forests. Students will become familiar with the basic components of soil and will be able to recognize factors affecting productivity and land value as well as important environmental issues associated with managing a large land base. The basic components of surface and subsurface water will be investigated with the view of understanding and protecting both water quality and quantity. Students will gain an appreciation of the forest environment by investigating principles of forest ecology and sustainable forest management. Emphasis will be placed on methods of gathering information in addition to laboratory exercises and field trips. There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.

Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.
Note: Course instruction is blended with face-to-face instruction including laboratory and field trip experience, and web supported home study. Students with credit for IPRM 103 will not receive credit for this course.


ASKI 102.3: Introduction to Legal Concepts in Resource Management

A study of the land systems used in Canada historically, currently and comparatively, as well as a look at the development and impact of legislation on Aboriginal people in Canada and recognition of traditional law. This course is designed to introduce students to various legal systems, international, national and local. Students will learn the basics of legal systems and structures and how jurisdiction and consultation have emerged as legal doctrines in Canada as well as how they impact on decisions and processes used by Aboriginal land and resource managers. There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.

Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.
Note: Course instruction is blended with face-to-face lecture and web supported home study. Students with credit for IPRM 100 will not receive credit for this course.


ASKI 103.3: Legal Process and Instruments in Resource Management

This course will introduce students to the study of legal instruments and process in resource management in Canada. The students will explore legal instruments in detail including ways of holding property, property transfer, property rights, business operations in First Nations communities, the taxation issues facing the business operations as well as a look at the development and impact of current legislation on lands and resources of the First Nation sector.There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.

Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.
Note: Course instruction is blended with face-to-face lecture and web supported home study. Students with credit for IPRM 200 will not receive credit for this course.


ASKI 104.3: Introduction to Management Issues

This course introduces students to the fundamental management principles of planning, organizing, leadership and control, and presents management tools and techniques for making informed decisions. Students are exposed to contemporary management issues facing Aboriginal communities such as economic development, corporate partnerships, land management, financial management and stakeholder consultation. The course combines management skills and issues related to leadership, community management, project planning, implementation and assessment, stakeholder analysis, communications and change management.

Note: This course is a web-based distance course delivered on-line. Students with credit for IPRM 101 will not receive credit for this course.


ASKI 105.3: Economics and Planning

Natural resource management and land use planning requires an understanding of the biophysical characteristics of the resource. It is also important to understand the role that humans have in changing natural resource quantity and quality. This course introduces the basic social science concepts and theory underlying environmental land use planning and natural resource management. In particular the course will focus on understanding what motivates and/or controls how people use natural resources.

Note: Course instruction is blended with face-to-face lecture and web supported home study. Students with credit for IPRM 102 will not receive credit for this course.


ASKI 201.3: Resource Management Project Assessment

Incorporates learning from previous courses in the Kanawayihetaytan Certificate. Students will identify an applied community-based research project and evaluate and assess the proposed project: legally, economically, and environmentally. Students will research land, history, market and impact of the proposal to determine pros and cons of the proposal. Written and oral presentations are required. This is an independently directed research course in which the student complete a specific resource management related project. This course aims to develop critical research skills and competencies for communicating research results effectively to leadership and community members.

Restriction(s): Only open to students in the Kanawayihetaytan Askiy program.
Prerequisite(s): ASKI 101, 102, 104, 105, and INDG 107 or permission of the department.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ASKI 103.
Note: Course instruction is blended with face-to-face instruction and web supported home study. Students with credit for IPRM 210 will not receive credit for this course.


ASKI 202.1: Introduction to Land Management Frameworks

The land and the relationship to land are inextricably linked to Indigenous peoples cultural identity, language and livelihood. Land stewardship is an inherent right and responsibility of the Indigenous people, who believe the land is a gift from the Creator to care for and sustain all living beings on earth. This course provides an examination into concepts of traditional Indigenous land stewardship as the foundational principles of land management and tenure, examines Federal Government programs on land management, and provides an overview of the Land Management Frameworks applicable on Indigenous Nation reserve lands.


ASKI 203.1: Introduction to the Duty to Consult

A study of the Crown’s constitutional duty to consult and accommodate Aboriginal peoples in Canada focusing on key cases that have helped inform and shape current policy and practice in this area. Students will examine the history of the duty to consult, with specific examples of how this duty has arisen in context to Aboriginal peoples’ interests in land use management. Current policies and practice together with the roles for federal, provincial and territorial departments and agencies, Aboriginal groups, and third parties will be examined.