This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2021 to April 2022.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2021-2022, please consult the class search website.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

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22 Results

CLAS 101.3: Introduction to Scientific Terminology

Students learn most of the hundreds of word parts, derived from Greek and Latin, which are found in the polysyllabic English vocabularies used in contemporary sciences and the grammatical principles that govern their use. They then learn to apply this knowledge in decoding and understanding the tens of thousands of complex English words made from them and the concepts they entail. Students will also learn about the changes such word parts have undergone over two millennia, and the linguistic principles governing those changes.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Note: Students with credit for CLAS 107.3 may not take this course for credit.


CLAS 103.3: Medical Terminology

Presents the most important Greek and Latin roots of the vocabulary of contemporary medicine and demonstrates the predictable patterns by which these roots combine. Students will learn to define new compounds and phrases by analysis of their parts and will be introduced to language history, linguistic principles and etymology.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Note: Students with credit for CLAS 163, 241, 262 or 263 may not take this course for credit. These courses have not been offered for more than ten years as of 2012. In Arts and Science programs, this course may only be used to fulfill the Electives Requirement.


CLAS 104.3: Classical Myths

A study of the traditional stories of Greek gods and heroes with some consideration given to both earlier Mesopotamian and later Roman mythic traditions.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Note: In Arts and Science programs, this course may only be used to fulfill the Electives Requirement.


CLAS 105.3: Classical Roots of English

An examination of the Latin and Greek roots of English vocabulary and grammar.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Note: In Arts and Science programs, this course may only be used to fulfill the Electives Requirement.


CLAS 107.3: Introduction to Legal Terminology

Students learn most of the hundreds of Latinate word parts most commonly found in the polysyllabic vocabulary of contemporary English Legal Terminology, along with strategies for generating useful translations of the tens of thousands of complex English words made from them and the concepts they entail. Students will also learn about the changes such word parts have undergone since Roman times, and the linguistic principles governing those changes.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Note: Students with credit for CLAS 101.3 may not take this course for credit.


CLAS 110.3: Greek Civilization

A survey of the culture of the Greeks to the end of the Classical period, based on readings in translation from Greek literature and on other ancient source materials.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


CLAS 111.3: Roman Civilization

Surveys Roman culture in the Republican and Imperial periods, based on readings in translation from Roman literature and on other ancient source materials.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Note: Students with credit for CLAS 121 may not take this course for credit.


CLAS 203.3: Advanced Medical Terminology

This course continues and develops the methods and materials introduced in Classics 103.3, presenting advanced and specialized Medical Terminologies and an introduction to the major Latin corpus of anatomical phrases known as the Nomina Anatomica. Students improve their etymological and linguistic skills and their ability to define previously unseen Latinate compound words and phrases. Special emphasis is placed on students' ability to deal at an advanced level with the differences between “etymological meaning” and contemporary usage.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): CLAS 103.3
Note: In Arts and Science programs, this course may only be used to fulfill the Electives Requirement. Students with credit for CLAS 106 may not take this course for credit.


CLAS 207.3: Greek Tragedy and the Culture of Fifth Century Athens

An examination of the dramatic, literary, social, and intellectual contexts that inform fifth-century Athenian tragedy.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units HIST, CLAS, or ENG; or 30 credit units of University.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 207 may not receive credit for this course.


CLAS 220.3: Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome

Studies daily life in ancient Athens and Rome.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units from: ARCH; CLAS; CMRS; HIST; and 30 credit units at the university.


CLAS 225.3: Women in Antiquity

Studies the life and achievements of women in the ancient world.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): CLAS 110 and 111, or completion of 30 credit units at the university.


CLAS 228.3: Epic

An introduction to Greek and Roman epic poetry with emphasis on its artistic qualities and cultural significance. Selections from Homer, Hesiod, Apollonius, Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, and/or Statius.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): CLAS 110 and 111, or completion of 30 credit units at the university.


CLAS 240.3: Ancient Art and Architecture I Bronze Age to Classical Greece

An introduction to the art and architecture of the Aegean Bronze Age and the origins and development of Greek vase painting, sculpture and architecture to the end of the Classical era.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): CLAS 110 and 111, or 6 credit units of ARTH courses, or completion of 30 credit units at the university.
Note: Students with credit for ART 201 may not take this course for credit.


CLAS 242.3: Ancient Art and Architecture II Graeco Roman World

A study of the Art and Architecture of the Graeco-Roman World (200 B.C. to A.D. 400), with focus on the Roman adaptation and transformation of Hellenistic Greek aesthetic practices and principles in the spheres of architecture, sculpture, interior decoration and luxury crafts.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): CLAS 110 and 111, or 6 credit units of ARTH courses, or completion of 30 credit units at the university.
Note: Students with credit for ART 201 may not take this course for credit.


CLAS 298.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


CLAS 299.6: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


CLAS 398.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours


CLAS 399.6: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours


CLAS 431.3: Problems in Medical Terminology

This seminar course provides an opportunity for senior undergraduates to apply their expertise in Medical Terminology to preliminary work on a wide variety of research projects in the largely unexplored field of medical miscommunication. The information and skills learned in this course will enable students to take an interdisciplinary approach to an emerging and complex set of problems which medical professionals themselves are not currently being trained to deal with. To this end, the course requires each student to do a research project on a specific problem arising from a paradox inherent in contemporary Western medicine: while knowledge of traditional medical terminology is still required for medical professionals (in fact, its use is ever-expanding), it is now being used by a third and even fourth generation of people who don't understand the word-parts and principles on which this terminology is based. More pragmatically, the course will prepare students to take a lead in dealing with this new and poorly understood category of potential medical error: those which arise from failures of accurate communication between health care professionals, failures with potentially serious consequences to health care in general, and to patients in particular.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours
Prerequisite(s): CLAS 203 and 75 credit units of university courses; or permission of the instructor.


CLAS 498.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours


CLAS 499.6: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours


CLAS 899.N/A: Special Topics

Offered occasionally in special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the department for more information.