This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2021 to April 2022.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2021-2022, please consult the class search website.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

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41 Results

ENG 301.3: Old English Language and Culture

This course is an introduction to Old English grammar, with select readings in the original language. Successful completion of the course will enable students to enroll in English 310.3, where they will have the opportunity to read more Old English literary texts. Included also will be selections from Beowulf in the original language, accompanied by study of the complete poem in Modern English.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 208 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 305.3: Canadian Fiction from Beginnings to 1960

This course studies the development of Canadian fiction in English to 1960 and may examine other forms of storytelling and non-fictional prose.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 352 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 307.3: Digital Literature and New Media

An introduction to digital narrative, poetry, and media theory. This course investigates the ways in which text, language, and writing have been used in creative and experimental digital media, including artworks and installations, e-literature and e-poetry, video games and websites. Students will read a variety of digital works alongside critical readings in new media theory and practice.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 42 credit units at the university.


ENG 308.3: Creative Nonfiction Workshop I

An introductory seminar/workshop in the basic techniques and methods of writing creative nonfiction. By examining the works of established writers, studying craft and history, engaging in workshop discussions, and producing a portfolio, students will be prepared to move forward to the advanced study of creative nonfiction.

Weekly hours: 6 Seminar/Discussion hours
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG and permission of the instructor.


ENG 309.3: Creative Nonfiction Workshop II

An advanced course for those with prior experience in the craft of writing creative nonfiction. Students will read and practice writing vigorous and compelling work. Mentorship is central; the instructor will aid students in compiling individual reading lists as they write and workshop intensive projects of their own devising.

Weekly hours: 6 Seminar/Discussion hours
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level ENG and permission of the instructor.


ENG 310.3: Old English Literature

A study of several poems and some prose passages in Old English, including elegies, battle narratives, and a more extensive consideration of Beowulf than in English 301, including its backgrounds and analogues.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): ENG 301.3
Note: Students with credit for ENG 208 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 311.3: The Canterbury Tales

An introduction to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with principal attention to The Canterbury Tales.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 211 or 212 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 312.3: Early Chaucer Dream and Romance Tragedy

The course examines Geoffrey Chaucer’s literary works before The Canterbury Tales, namely, the dream visions and the romance tragedy Troilus and Criseyde.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 313.3: Middle English Romances

An introduction to late medieval stories of adventure, through the Middle English romance genre and its contexts.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 212 or 213 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 314.3: Early British Drama

An introduction to the varieties of drama produced in the British Isles up to the inception of permanent theatres in late 16th-century London.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 316.3: Middle English Literature of Defiance and Dissent

In England, the late Middle Ages (1100-1500) were a time of social and political upheaval as well as literary innovation. This course examines Middle English literary texts that reflected and participated in historical and intellectual change and debate.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 319.3: Renaissance Literature I The Sixteenth Century

Sixteenth-century English literature absorbed and contributed to the European Renaissance, led at Henry VIII's court by the Thomas More circle, while popular culture developed new expressions of older traditions. These rich courtly and popular traditions unite in the achievements of the Elizabethan younger generation, especially the Sidneys, Spenser, and Shakespeare. Omitting full-length drama and epic treated elsewhere, this course highlights other major genres of prose and poetry in English from 1485 to 1603.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 320 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 322.3: Renaissance Literature II The Seventeenth Century

Seventeenth-century literature reflects a nation emerging into modernity through a revolution in politics and science and a reshaping of social bonds and relationships. Excluding full-length drama and epic, this course focuses on both sacred and secular poetry by such writers as John Donne, George Herbert, Aemelia Lanyer, and Ben Jonson, and prose by such writers as Francis Bacon and Thomas Browne.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 325 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 324.3: Renaissance Drama

A study of English drama, 1580-1640, including such playwrights as Marlowe, Kyd, Shakespeare, Jonson, Dekker, Middleton, and Ford. The course will investigate the philosophies, techniques, power, and popularity associated with Tudor, Stuart, and Caroline plays.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 326.3: Renaissance Epic

This course explores two of English literature’s grandest, longest, and most demanding poems, Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene and John Milton’s Paradise Lost. It investigates Spenser's and Milton's transformation of classical epic and medieval romance conventions in the context of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English culture, politics and religion.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note:Students with credit for ENG 325.6 or ENG 323.3 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 327.3: English Drama 1660 to 1737

A study of the drama of the Restoration and the 18th Century, emphasizing the comedy of manners, but also dealing with dramatic genres particular to the period.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 330.3: British and Irish Literature 1900 to 1950

A study of poetry, drama, and prose in relation to the historical and political contexts of Britain and Ireland in the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Sitwell, Sassoon, Yeats, Auden, Shaw, Synge, Joyce, Forster, Lawrence, Woolf, Sayers, Waugh, Orwell.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 331.3: Literature of the Romantic Period

A study of British literature from 1780 to 1830, examining the nature of Romanticism and the usefulness of the term "Romantic," and emphasizing the works of such writers as William Wordsworth, Mary Shelley, and John Keats.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 334.3: Prose and Poetry of Victorian Period

A study of the period 1830-1890, with emphasis on such prose writers as Carlyle, J. S. Mill, Newman, Huxley, Arnold and Pater, and such poets as Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, the Pre-Raphaelites, and Hopkins.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 335.3: The Emergence of Indigenous Literatures in Canada

Examines the emergence of written literature among Indigenous people in Canada from first contact to the 1970s. Attention will be paid to how and why Indigenous people took up literacy and literature and to the distinctive forms of writing that emerged.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note(s): Prior completion of ENG 243.3 is recommended but not required.


ENG 338.3: Contemporary North American Indigenous Literatures

A survey of Indigenous literature from 1968 to the present, examining the explosion of Indigenous writing in the United States and in Canada during that period. Drawing on a range of genres, we will investigate the causes of this literary "renaissance" and the literary forms that have emerged from it.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note(s): Prior completion of ENG 243.3 is recommended but not required.


ENG 340.3: Eighteenth Century British Literature

A time of rebels and reactionaries, Enlightenment Britain (1660-1800) saw writers respond to dramatic social change. In this brief but grand tour of literary modes and genres, students will encounter many of the ideas that underpin contemporary Eurocentric culture. The course will include works of satire and sentiment, amatory fiction and conduct books, political poetry, slave narratives, plays of wit, and the first periodicals. Featured authors may include Behn, Swift, Pope, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, and Johnson.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 336 and/or ENG 337 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 341.3: The British Novel 1850 to 1900

A study of the development of the British novel, beginning with the mature work of Charles Dickens and George Eliot, and culminating in the late century work of authors such as Meredith, Hardy, Stevenson, and Wilde.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 374 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 358.3: Canadian Drama

The development of Canadian drama in English, with emphasis on the period since 1960.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 359.3: Western Canadian Literature

A study of Western Canadian literature in English, especially fiction, poetry, and drama, produced on the Canadian prairies.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 360.3: British and Irish Literature Since 1950

A study of poetry, drama, and prose in relation to the shifting political and cultural landscapes of Britain and Ireland since 1950. Authors may include Larkin, Smith, Heaney, Beckett, Friel, Kureishi, Selvon, Kelman, and Carter.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 362.3: The British Novel 1800 to 1850

A study of the development of the British novel, beginning with Jane Austen and Sir Walter Scott, and ending with the early work of Dickens, Gaskell, and the Brontes.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 374 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 363.3: Approaches to 20th and 21st Century Fiction

This course examines major works of 20th- and 21st-century fiction, including short fiction, across national boundaries. Students will explore literary genres and modes such as realism, modernism, postmodernism, magic realism, and metafiction. Authors may include Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, Morrison, Naipaul, Rushdie, Atwood, King, Munro, Carter and McEwan.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 365.6: Creative Writing Workshop

Intended for students who are seriously interested in the practice of imaginative writing (fiction, poetry, etc.). Course work will include an assignment of writing each week. Enrolment will be limited.

Weekly hours: 2 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level English and permission of the instructor.


ENG 366.3: Advanced Creative Writing Fiction

Intended for students who have acquired some practice and skill in the writing of prose.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units of 100-level English and permission of the instructor.
Note: A special application, available from the Department of English, english.department@usask.ca, is required for this course.


ENG 368.3: Approaches to 20th and 21st Century Poetry

A study of poetry and poetics from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. The course examines the tension between established forms of poetry and the efforts of modern poets to "make it new" (Pound), to reinvent poetry. In poetry since the Second World War, we will examine the enduring influence of modernism as well as anti- and post-modern strategies, forms, and styles. 20th- and 21st-century cultural and historical contexts will be crucial throughout. Poets studied may include Yeats, Pound, H.D., Williams, Moore, Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Ginsberg, Plath, Heaney, Walcott, Atwood, Brand, Halfe, and Wah.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 373.3: English Fiction to 1800

A study of various types of prose fiction from early romances, travel tales and rogue biographies, to Defoe and the rise and development of the novel in England. Particular emphasis will be given to the major novels and novelists of the 18th century.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.


ENG 377.3: Approaches to Modern and Contemporary Drama

Reflecting the remarkable transformation of theatre in modernist and postmodern contexts, this course engages with dramatic texts and movements from the late 19th century through to contemporary plays and performances. While works in translation will be addressed, including those by Ibsen and Strindberg, the primary focus will be British, Irish, and American dramatists, such as Shaw, O’Neill, Beckett, Pinter, Williams, Hansberry, Stoppard, Churchill, and Kane.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level ENG
Note: Students with credit for ENG 348, 349, or 380.6 (Modern Drama, Primarily British and American – discontinued course) may not take this course for credit.


ENG 380.3: American Literature to 1900

The 19th century was a turbulent and formative period in American history, marked by the legacy of revolution along with civil war, the abolition of slavery, the emergence of feminism, and the settlement of the West. This course will examine how different writers engaged with the political, moral, and cultural implications raised by these issues, and the distinctive literary culture that grew out of this engagement. Although most course time will be spent in the 19th century, the course will look back to the 17th and 18th centuries to examine the literary, intellectual, and religious contexts that were relevant to the shaping of this culture.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 343 or ENG 344 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 381.3: American Literature from 1900 to the Present

From the turn of the twentieth century, the United States has been marked by two important literary and cultural phenomena: modernism and postmodernism. As a survey of American literature from 1900 to the present, this course is an attempt to figure out what these two large movements look like, to understand how and why the shift from modernism to postmodernism occurred, to account for the differences and similarities between them, and, in a post-9/11 present, to ask: what’s next?

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 345 or ENG 347 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 382.3: Canadian Fiction from 1960 to the Present

A study of Canadian fiction in English, and some non-fictional prose, from 1960 to the present.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 352 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 383.3: Decolonizing Theories and Literatures

This course provides a foundational grounding in decolonial theories and literatures. Themes to be examined include subaltern knowledge, land, language, hybridity, environment, gender, power, and history. A wide range of theorists from (post)colonial and decolonizing contexts will be considered in tandem with a selection of contemporary Anglophone literature.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): 3 credit units 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 283 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 389.3: Structures of English

A survey of theoretical approaches to English grammar and rhetoric, with an emphasis on English in literary contexts.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English, or LING 111, or a senior course in a language.


ENG 394.3: Literary and Cultural Theory

Literary theory serves as a kind of base for all modes of criticism and interpretation; it can be thought of as playing a similar role as math does for the sciences, or philosophy for history. This course offers an introduction to some of the major texts and approaches to literary and cultural theory, going as far back as antiquity, but with an emphasis on relatively contemporary debates.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): 3 credit units of 200-level English.
Note: Students with credit for ENG 203.6 may not take this course for credit.


ENG 398.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours


ENG 399.6: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours