This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2020 to April 2021.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2020-2021, please consult the class search website.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

Course search


35 Results

ENVS 201.3: Foundations of Sustainability

The intention of this course is to provide foundational knowledge about sustainability science and concepts while also exposing students to the key foci areas they can pursue with the certificate. Students will be exposed to an interdisciplinary perspective, with materials from the social and natural sciences as well as humanist perspectives. This course is team-taught in an interactive environment with an emphasis on critical thinking exercises and class discussions.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 credit units at the University of Saskatchewan.


ENVS 401.3: Sustainability in Action

This course combines seminars and project-based activities to examine local and global sustainability issues, integrating perspectives and knowledge from both the social and natural sciences. Students will work in interdisciplinary, collaborative groups to address sustainability challenges on campus and in our community.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): ENVS 201 and permission of the instructors. Please note that students in the B.Sc.(RRM) in Renewable Resource Management; B.S.A. in Environmental Science; and B.A.& Sc. in Environment & Society are not required to complete ENVS 201 as a prerequisite; please contact the School for a prerequisite override using sustainability.certificate@usask.ca. This course is intended for senior undergraduate students.


ENVS 803.3: Research in Environment and Sustainability

The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students to conceptual, practical, and ethical issues in conducting interdisciplinary research about environment and sustainability. By the end of the course, students will have a research plan from which their proposal and research activities can be developed.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


ENVS 804.3: Advanced Problem Solving for Environment and Sustainability

This course provides an advanced opportunity to develop proficiency with interdisciplinary problem analysis frameworks. This will enable students to critically appraise and constructively engage with environmental and sustainability policy processes, and develop a functional understanding of conventional and emergent institutional approaches to problem solving.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


ENVS 805.3: Data Analysis and Management

Environmental data management is complex because of its volume, qualitative and quantitative forms, and temporal and spatial characteristics. This course introduces students to statistical, qualitative, and visual methods of problem solving and data reduction and representation and describes methods for managing large and complex data sets.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


ENVS 806.3: Field Skills in Environment and Sustainability

Combining a field experience at Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve with a team-oriented sustainability assessment, this course will provide hands-on training in a variety of practical skills and techniques in ecological hydrological and social sciences related to rural communities and agro-ecosystems. Students should be prepared to work in the outdoors.

Weekly hours: 3 Practicum/Lab hours
Restriction(s): Enrolment in a SENS graduate program or permission from instructor


ENVS 807.3: Sustainability in Theory and Practice

This course confronts the paradoxes of understanding, assessing, and resolving challenges of sustainability. Students broaden and deepen understandings of sustainability, learn about their own strengths and biases, and develop both creative and analytical skills using in-depth case studies that require interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours
Restriction(s): Enrolment in a SENS graduate program or permission from instructor


ENVS 808.3: Tools and Applications for Sustainability Problem Solving

This course is designed for graduate students to improve their knowledge of applied environmental and sustainability problems and develop problem-solving skills. The focus will be on problem identification concepts, investigation of potential causes, identification of potential causes of environmental and sustainability problems, identification and implementation of potential solutions or remedial measures, and action plans to evaluate anticipated results.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours
Restriction(s): Enrolment in a SENS graduate program or permission from instructor


ENVS 809.3: Doctoral Seminar in Environment and Sustainability

This seminar course will examine ideas and assumptions that underpin attempts to achieve “sustainability” and explore different strategies aimed at advancing sustainability objectives. Students will examine fundamental conflicts in values and choices, governance options and challenges, and scientific and societal uncertainty about human-environment interactions.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the SENS Ph.D. program. Course will be made available to students in Ph.D. programs of other units by permission from instructor.


ENVS 811.3: Multiple Ways of Knowing in Environmental Decision Making

This course is set in the context of environmental decision-making, and involves critical examination of human-nature relations and multiple ways of knowing (epistemologies). Knowledge systems addressed include, but are not limited to, Aboriginal knowledge systems and intuitive ways of knowing. Applications to the legal "duty to consult" with Aboriginal peoples will be addressed, and students are asked to analyze their own decision-making beliefs and practices in the context of multiple understandings of the world.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours
Note: Students in the School of Environment and Sustainability will be given priority up to a limit of 15.


ENVS 812.3: Statistical Methods in Environment and Sustainability

This course is designed for graduate students in environmental sciences to learn statistical data analysis and gain experience in applying common approaches to experimental problems, understand sequential process of model building, develop ability to understand and synthesize desired information from data analysis.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
B>Prerequisite(s):An undergraduate degree in an environmental discipline or permission of the instructor.


ENVS 813.3: Numerical Modelling for Environmental Scientists and Engineers

This course provides graduate students with a set of modelling skills to solve a range of water-related environmental problems. The models help us to think through physical processes and interpret observations. Students will learn to critically assess modelling studies as will be needed throughout their careers.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in a graduate program in the School of Environment and Sustainability or permission of the instructor.


ENVS 814.3: Qualitative Methodologies

Bridging theory and practice, this course provides an introduction to qualitative methodologies and methods. Throughout, students will develop their ability to articulate terminology, concepts, and criteria; journal using reflexive questions; compare and select methodologies and methods; and apply basic methods of data collection, data management, analysis, and reporting.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


ENVS 815.3: Modelling for Water Security

The movement of chemicals in aquatic systems has major implications for water policy and management. A wide variety of man-made contaminants reach aquatic systems. Case studies will investigate the properties that determine where chemicals will go in the environment and whether they will pose risks when they get there.


ENVS 816.3: Chemicals in Acquatic Systems

The movement of chemicals in aquatic systems has major implications for water policy and management. A wide variety of man-made contaminants reach aquatic systems. Case studies will investigate the properties that determine where chemicals will go in the environment and whether they will pose risks when they get there.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be registered in the Master of Water Security (M.W.S.) program, or have permission of the instructor.
Note: Students with credit for ENVS 823 or TOX 843 will not receive credit for this course.


ENVS 817.3: Fundamentals of Hydrogeology

Groundwater flow; connections between groundwater and the rest of the hydrologic cycle; well hydraulics; groundwater chemistry; solute and contaminant transport in groundwater systems.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be registered in the Master of Water Security (M.W.S.) program.


ENVS 820.3: Water and Human Health and Wellbeing

Students examine critical water-health issues through a distinctly interdisciplinary lens. Water and wellbeing connections from individual to chromosphere scales are explored via case study, epidemiological modeling, GIS, media fact-checking and assignments. Students deepen knowledge about roles of water in preserving social, cultural, economic and political resilience to health.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be registered in the Master of Water Security (M.W.S.) program.


ENVS 821.3: Sustainable Water Resources

This course will explore issues related to water resource sustainability from physical, chemical, biological, socio-economic and technological perspectives. Current threats to water resources in terms of water availability, water quality, and ecosystem services will be examined, and evolving methods to manage water resources more sustainably will be discussed.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


ENVS 822.3: Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainability

A graduate level course designed to introduce students in an integrative manner to the field of biodiversity conservation and how to apply its principles to best promote sustainability. Understanding biodiversity and its management requires an interdisciplinary approach with particular reference to mechanisms of change and human impacts on the environment. This course will be interdisciplinary in its approach. The course will focus on: biodiversity (definition, types of biodiversity, distribution, economic and social value); threats to biodiversity (habitat loss, exotic species and their impacts, climate change); and conservation of biodiversity (species at risk, habitats, protected areas). This course will also review social, ethical and policy issues surrounding biodiversity conservation and management (international approaches and agreements, national strategy and regulations for Canada, Saskatchewan provincial regulations), including traditional knowledge.


ENVS 823.3: Chemicals in the Environment

This course will provide an understanding of the processes that control the movement of chemical contaminants in the environment. Local and global methods for chemical regulation/management will be addressed in the context of society and economics. The use of modeling to predict the environmental fate/effects of contaminants will be presented.

Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Course Coordinator is necessary.
Note: Students with credit for ENVS 816 will not receive credit for this course.


ENVS 824.3: River Science

This course will teach students the fundamentals of biophysical science as applied in riverine settings. It will begin by examining physical and biological processes that naturally occur in rivers, then layer on top of that understanding the influence of climatic variables (ice and evaporation) and human influences (river channel modification and contaminant loading).

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s):Undergraduate degree in natural sciences or engineering, or special permission from instructor.


ENVS 825.3: Water Resources Management in Cold Regions

This course exposes students to the management of water resources in cold regions, both through western science and Traditional knowledge. It focuses on the following components of the hydrological cycle: river ice, snow and permafrost. Real examples from consulting services will also be included as in-class activities.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s):An undergraduate degree.


ENVS 826.3: Climate Change

This course will help the student develop a fundamental understanding of the climate system, and the potential environmental and social consequences of climate change. Students will also gain a broad knowledge of climate change, climate change impacts in the water cycle, arctic hydrology and how it is related to sea level rising.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s):An undergraduate degree in an environmental discipline or permission of the instructor.


ENVS 827.3: Breakthroughs in Water Security Research

Seminar that investigates the latest in water security research nationally and internationally. Developing awareness and understanding for major concepts in water security and helping students understand what constitutes world class research.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


ENVS 828.3: Isotope Tracers in Catchment Hydrology

This course is an introduction to the principles of stable isotope chemistry as applied to environmental research in the hydrosphere and biosphere, focusing on the use of stable isotope investigative tools in a variety of ecological situations.

Weekly hours: 1.5 Lecture hours and 2 Practicum/Lab hours
Prerequisite(s): Bachelor of Science.


ENVS 829.3: River Lake and Wetland Science

This course introduces river, land and wetland science in the context of water security to students. This course will explore many of the physical, chemical and biological factors that characterize these water bodies. Students will learn, through case studies, many of the issues facing rivers, lakes and wetlands including dam and dam removal, eutrophication, wetland drainage, and invasive species.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be registered in the Master of Water Security (M.W.S.) program, or have permission of the instructor.


ENVS 832.3: Risk Assessment and Negotiation of Environmental Issues

This course helps students develop a comprehensive understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues and teaches them the roles that science and society have in the assessment and management of such issues. The class will elucidate the perspectives of different stakeholders using classic and interactive elements.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours


ENVS 833.3: CoManagement of Northern Ecosystems and Natural Resources

This course explores concepts, trends, opportunities, and challenges in the movement towards co-management of natural resources and ecosystems in northern Canada and the circumpolar world. Rapid social and biophysical change characterizes this region, so students will gain an in-depth understanding of how co-management institutions interact with this critical context.

Weekly hours: 3 Seminar/Discussion hours


ENVS 881.3: Resource and Environmental Policy Analysis

This course will focus on developing an understanding of natural resource and environmental challenges using economic theory. A series of natural resource and environmental issues will be studied with existing and proposed policy measures analyzed using an economic framework.

Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BPBE 430 and ENVS 881.


ENVS 898.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the school for more information.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): Registration in a graduate program.
Note: There may be extra fees in addition to tuition associated with this course.


ENVS 899.6: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations. Students interested in these courses should contact the school for more information.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours
Prerequisite(s): Registration in a graduate program.


ENVS 990.0: Seminar in Environment and Sustainability

Not Available


ENVS 992.6: Project in Environment and Sustainability

Project in Environment and Sustainability is a requirement of the Master of Sustainable Environmental Management (M.SEM.) degree, and accessible only to those students. Intended to permit students to build upon skills gained through the course component of their program, the project gives an opportunity to further investigate an aspect of environment and sustainability of particular interest and in a manner which contributes to their professional development.


ENVS 994.0: Master's Research in Environment and Sustainability

Students writing a Master's thesis must register in this course.


ENVS 996.0: PhD Research in Environment and Sustainability

Students writing a Ph.D. thesis must register in this course.