Subject: History
Credit units: 3
Offered: Either Term 1 or Term 2
Weekly hours: 2 Lecture hours and 1 Seminar/Discussion hours
College: Arts and Science
Department: History

Description

Courses in this series examine the complexity of identity and the ever-changing and complicated nature of community through an exploration of history. Identities are never ‘fixed’ or constructed in isolation; they are always both ‘invented’ and the result of historical change. Communities are similarly complex: never autonomous, always shaped by history and the interplay between internal dynamics and relationships with forces outside of the community. All courses in this series are linked through their exploration of the history of identities and communities but they explore that history in different places and times. Some courses will take a micro-level view, exploring the history of identity in one particular location or community over time and relating those changes to broader perspectives; others will look at the way broad historical forces shaped identities. Possible areas of exploration may include: historical roots and myths surrounding so called tribalism in Africa and the contemporary impacts of this discourse; the spread nationalism in the 18th and 19th centuries and the rise of the modern nation-state; how such groups as Kurds have been able to maintain a distinct identity over time; Quebec’s status as a separate ‘nation’ in Canada

Attention:A maximum of nine credit units of 100-level HIST may be taken for credit. Only six of these credit units may count toward a History major or minor. The remaining three credit units will count as a junior elective in Requirement 7.
Note: Students may not take this course more than once for credit, even if the special topic is different.
Note: This course may be offered more than once per term, with a different topic for each offering. To see all of the specific topic(s), click on the CRN for each lecture section in the Class Search to see the specific description for that class.

Upcoming class offerings

For full details about upcoming courses, refer to the class search tool or, if you are a current student, the registration channel in PAWS.

Syllabi

Examples of current or recently-offered class syllabus material can be found on the Open CourseWare website.

The syllabus is a public document that provides detail about a class, such as the schedule of activities, learning outcomes, and weighting of assignments and examinations. Please note that the examples provided in Open CourseWare do not represent a complete set of current or previous syllabus material. Rather, they are presented solely for the purpose of indicating what may be required for a given class.

For more information about syllabi, visit the Academic Courses Policy.

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