This Course and Program Catalogue is effective from May 2023 to April 2024.

Not all courses described in the Course and Program Catalogue are offered each year. For a list of course offerings in 2023-2024, please consult the class search website.

The following conventions are used for course numbering:

  • 010-099 represent non-degree level courses
  • 100-699 represent undergraduate degree level courses
  • 700-999 represent graduate degree level courses

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11 Results

AGRC 110.3: Scientific Literacy and Communication for the Agricultural Sciences

Developing scientific literacy and communication skills is a necessary step to participating fully and professionally in the agricultural bioeconomy. Through active learning, students are introduced to the profession of agrology and professional ethics. Students learn the communication and interpersonal skills needed to support their academic success and future professional success. Scientific literacy is introduced as the foundation for learning in the agricultural sciences. Basic skills for handling and displaying data are introduced and reinforced with participatory activities. Oral and written communication skills are practiced and reinforced.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours and 1 Tutorial hours


AGRC 111.3: Introduction to Plant and Soil Sciences

An introduction to agricultural systems with a focus on sustainability in a changing environment. Current agricultural challenges and issues will be used to highlight and illustrate the interactions between plant, animal, microbial, human and environment components. The soil/plant/environment interface is emphasized. Management decisions affecting agricultural systems, cropping and land use are examined both regionally and globally.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours and 2 Practicum/Lab hours
Note: Students with credit for PLSC 41 will not receive credit for this course.


AGRC 112.3: Animal Agriculture and Food Science

An introduction to agricultural systems and the interactions between microbial plant, animal, and human components. The emphasis is on issues and problems associated with animal production, value-added processing, marketing and the consumption of food.

Weekly hours: 3 Lecture hours and 2 Practicum/Lab hours


AGRC 113.3: Introduction to Agri Food Economics

This course explains economic concepts as they are applied to the agriculture industry. The theory of economics helps us to make decisions in cases where we have scarce resources. Each module describes economic theories and provides real-world examples to show you the relevance and power of economic thinking. The course also takes a broader view of decision making by considering the effects of individual and government decisions on communities and the environment.


AGRC 211.3: Global Food Security

This course will introduce students to issues of global food security. Examples taken from the origins of agriculture to modern practices are used to illustrate themes, including sustainable agriculture, food quality and quantity, plant and animal breeding, genetically modified organisms, and productivity improvement. An overview of the food distribution system, the impact of malnourishment and chronic poverty are also presented.

Prerequisite(s): completion of 30 credit units at the university level


AGRC 298.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


AGRC 311.3: International Study Tour

Students are introduced to the agriculture and culture of the designated country through pre-departure readings and seminars. While on tour, students will interact with local farmers/industries/government/students/faculty to see agro ecosystems in other countries first hand. Students will become more aware of challenges and develop possible solutions within the context of enhancing a sustainable, secure, food system. Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.

Note: There are additional non-refundable costs in addition to tuition fees.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
Note(s): As a study tour this class will be offered from time to time but is not designated to any particular term.


AGRC 398.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


AGRC 445.3: Experiential Learning in the Workplace

Students apply their academic knowledge while acquiring and expanding transferable skills through work experience. A self-directed learning agreement completed by the student, with input from the employer and approved by the course facilitator, will detail the learning outcomes and how proof of learning will be verified. Reflective journal entries, online discussion, face-to-face interviews, a self- and employer evaluation plus completion of a final product are required. This is an open learning class which takes place from May to July each year, with the majority of work being done over the summer months. Students must first obtain summer employment before registering for the course.

Restriction(s): Open to students enrolled in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 60 credit units at the university-level.
Note: Students with credit for PLSC 445 will not receive credit for this course.


AGRC 498.3: Special Topics

Offered occasionally by visiting faculty and in other special situations to cover, in depth, topics that are not thoroughly covered in regularly offered courses.


AGRC 800.0: Work Integrated Learning Concentration

Graduate students apply their academic knowledge while acquiring and expanding transferable skills through work experience. A self-directed plan completed by the student, with input from the employer and approved by the supervisor, supervisory committee and graduate chair, will detail the anticipated learning outcomes. Regular self- and employer evaluations are required, along with a final paper. This is an open learning class which can take place in any academic term.

Prerequisite(s): Permission must be granted by AgBio Dean's office. Students must be pursuing a thesis-based graduate program (ie., MSc or PhD) in Animal and Poultry Science, Plant Sciences, Soil Science, Food Science, or Agricultural and Resource Economics.
Note: Students enrolled in the work integrated learning concentration in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources must register in AGRC 800.0.